Each Year We Try to Capture Moments

Asst. Professor of Biology Tami Ransom is in her first semester at Wabash.

Howard W. Hewitt – A lot of time and oxygen is spent around Wabash College trying to explain to high school seniors, and others, the magic that happens in our classrooms.

Sure, our young visitors are told about the important professor-student interaction and how fellow students will challenge and support each other in intellectual discourse.

But citing the oldest cliche – a picture is worth a thousand words.

Each fall members of the Public Affairs staff take one or two weeks to get into classrooms and try to record some of that magic for all to see. It’s always an interesting challenge to walk into the room with a shoulder bag full of photo equipment and ask not to be noticed.

Our challenge is to try to capture those moments when professor and student connect. We look for that moment the light bulb goes off when learning a new concept, idea, or the experiment works.

We’re not going to find that moment each time we enter a classroom for 30-45 minutes. But it’s a fun challenge trying to capture some magic and witnessing a Wabash College education in progress.

Here are some of the photos we’ve shot to date. We’ll be adding more!

Kim Johnson’s photos:

Associate Professor of Religion Glen Helman and Asst. Professor of Political Science Lexi Hoerl

Visiting Assistant Prof. of Classics Matthew Sears and Asst. Prof. of Mathematics Colin McKinney

Asst. Professor of Biology Rebecca Sparks-Thissen

Howard Hewitt’s photos:

Asst. Professor of Philosophy Mark Brouwer

Asst. Professor of Chemistry Laura Wysocki

Asst. Professor of Biology Tami Ransom

Jim Amidon’s photos:

Asst. Professor of Chinese Qian Pullen

Associate Professor of Rhetoric Todd McDorman

Asst Professor of Art History Elizabeth Morton and Asst. Professor of Rhetoric Sara Drury

 

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